Blade Runner and Dystopic Los Angeles

In honor of Blade Runner 2049, I took a look at the first Blade Runner and the reasons why it very improbably came to stand as the iconic “L.A. nightmare.” The piece appeared in Atlantic CityLab, a site devoted to understanding urban planning and policy:

Beyond Blade Runner: Imagining Community in Cities of the Future

Do science fiction writers have anything positive to say about future cities? That’s the question that I answer in the affirmative in an essay in the Los Angeles Review of Books. “Beyond Blade Runner: Imagining Community in Cities of the Future” looks to books by China Miéville, Samuel R. Delany, Nicola Griffith, Nalo Hopkinson, and Kim Stanley Robinson for ideas about the continual construction and reconstruction of community in imagined cities.